Current Exhibitions

Georgia O'Keeffe, Black Pansy & Forget-Me-Nots (Pansy), 1926. Oil on canvas, 27 1/8 x 12 1/4 inches. Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York, Gift of Mrs. Alfred S. Rossin. Copyright Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, New Mexico/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Brooklyn Museum

Georgia O’Keeffe: Art, Image, Style

Georgia O'Keeffe, the pioneering modernist artist, had sensibility to spare. She lavished it on her work, of course, but she applied nearly as much to self-presentation.

"...[This exhibition] reveals in particular how this painter of simplified images of enlarged flowers, Lake George tree trunks, and New Mexico's terra-cotta hills applied her meticulous sense of austerity and detail to every garment she owned." --New York Times art critic Roberta Smith in 2017

Georgia O'Keeffe: Art, Image, Style is the first exhibition to explore the art, image, and personal style of one of America's most iconic artists. O'Keeffe was at the forefront of the American avant-garde nearly from the moment she appeared on the scene in New York in the first decades of the 20th century. Georgia O'Keeffe offers an intimate glimpse at the artist alongside her art with her paintings, photo portraits, and original clothing.

Click here for information about programs and events related to the exhibition.

Georgia O'Keeffe: Art, Style, Image is organized by the Brooklyn  Museum with guest curator Dr. Wanda M. Corn, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor Emerita in Art History, Stanford University, and made possible by the National Endowment for the Arts

The Wichita presentation has been generously underwritten by lead sponsors Paula and Barry Downing. The Lattner Family Foundation and Judy Slawson provided additional major underwriting. Charles E. Baker and Dr. Dennis and Mrs. Ann Ross are principal sponsors. The Trust Company of Kansas, Fred and Mary Koch Foundation, Celebrity Cruises and Emprise Bank are substantial corporate sponsors.

Generous support has been provided by Louise Beren, Donna Bunk, DeVore Foundation, J. Eric Engstrom and Robert Bell, Mary Eves, Rich and Joey Giblin, Norma Greever, Sonia Greteman and Chris Brunner, Gridley Family Foundation, John and Karen Hageman, Sondra Langel, Mike and Dee Michaelis, Tom and Mindy Page, Will and Kristin Price, Debbie and Ron Sinclair, Mary Sue Smith, Sarah T. Smith, and K.T. Wiedemann Foundation, Inc.

Ann and Martin Bauer, Emily Bonavia, Dr. John and Nancy Brammer, Sharon and Alan Fearey, Toni and Bud Gates, Trish Higgins, Richard Hite and Anita Jones, Delmar and Mary Klocke, Dr. Barry and Jane Murphy, Georgia and Keith Stevens, Marni Vliet Stone and David Stone, and Sue and Kurt Watson are additional exhibition patrons.

All museum exhibitions receive generous sponsorship from the Friends of the Wichita Art Museum and the City of Wichita.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More
Less

Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936, printed early 1960s. Gelatin silver print, 13 3/8 x 10 1/4 inches. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri. Gift of Hallmark Cards

Dignity vs. Despair: Dorothea Lange and Depression-Era Photography, 1933-1942

Few works of American art are more iconic than Dorothea Lange's photograph Migrant Mother, a striking image of a careworn woman struggling to help her family survive. This photograph is one of the masterpieces in Dignity vs. Despair: Dorothea Lange and Depression-Era Photography, 1933-1942.

Click here for information about the Curator Talk related to this exhibition.

Drawn from The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s renowned photography collection, Dignity vs. Despair highlights the work of Lange and four other photographers--Walker Evans, Arthur Rothstein, Marion Post Wolcott, and Peter Sekaer--each of whom documented the devastating effects of the Great Depression.

After the stock market crash in 1929, the United States experienced a deep and long lasting economic depression. Fortunes were lost and many found themselves jobless and homeless. Farms were destroyed due to drought and extreme soil erosion. The Farm Security Administration (FSA), created in response to the Great Depression, provided loans to farmers, resettlement options for destitute families, and camps for mi­grant workers. Governmental agencies like the FSA saw photography as an effective way to document the disaster--to show firsthand the need for humanitarian aid for suffering.

The exhibition of 64 photographs is arranged thematically and geographically into three sections. The first section includes Lange's images of urban hardship in San Francisco in 1933-38. The next section focuses on the South, an area hard hit by the Depression. The final section documents the plight of the migrant worker. The integration of images with the photographers’ own words--excerpt­ed from captions, field notes, and interviews--gives a poignant look at one of the most difficult times in U.S. history.

On view in the Paul Ross Gallery.

This exhibition has been organized by The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

More
Less

Hung Liu, Migrant Mother, II, 2016. Oil on canvas, 60 x 60 inches. Private collection

Hung Liu: Migrant Stories

Hung Liu: Migrant Stories features paintings and prints by contemporary artist Liu. Based on the iconic photographs of Dust Bowl and Depression-era artist Dorothea Lange, Liu's works depict families and children devastated by the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Click here for information about the Artist Talk related to this exhibition. 

Although dealing with heartbreaking subject matter, Liu's works are beautifully vibrant--each feature loose, fluid layers of color, with central figures that almost seem to glow. The exhibition asks viewers to consider not only suffering, injustice, and displacement, but also the possibility of human resilience. WAM is pleased to exhibit Hung Liu: Migrant Stories at the same time as we present Dignity vs. Despair: Dorothea Lange and Depression-Era Photography, 1933–1942, an exhibition that includes several of the photographs that inspired Liu.

On view in the Scott and Carol Ritchie Gallery.

More
Less

Arthur Dove, Forms Against the Sun, about 1926. Oil on metal, 29 x 21 inches. Wichita Art Museum, Roland P. Murdock Collection

Arthur Dove: Reality and Abstraction

Arthur Dove: Reality and Abstraction features works by one of WAM's most beloved artists. The exhibition includes large oil paintings as well as miniature watercolors taken from the artist's sketchbooks. Each work reflects Dove's lifelong practice of observing natural elements--including the sun, moon, ocean, and landscape—and then simplifying them into basic shapes and colors. The resulting paintings exist, as Dove described them, "where reality and abstraction meet."

The Dove paintings will be on view during Georgia O'Keeffe: Art, Image, Style, WAM's major spring exhibition. Like his friend and colleague O'Keeffe, Dove is a legend of 20th-century American art.

On view in the DeVore Gallery.

More
Less
No Idle Hands: Treasures from the Americana Collection at the Wichita Art Museum

No Idle Hands gives museum visitors a chance to view the art and artifacts that reflect daily life in America's early history. The exhibition features highlights from WAM's newly acquired collection of more than 450 works of American folk art, including some of the best furniture, samplers, hunting decoys and lures, and corner store paraphernalia from the new collection.

It tells the story of America's past while also foregrounding the beautiful materials and craftsmanship of many of these objects.

WAM's curatorial staff organized the exhibition with local architect Dean Bradley, of Platt, Bradley, Adams, and Associates. As a specialist in residential architecture with a personal passion for history and preservation who also serves on the board of The Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum, Bradley designed a gallery installation evoking the stores and homes in which the works were originally used and cherished. Shop signs--including iconic striped barber poles--conjure up an image of Main Street. Portraits, toys, and miniatures--small, hand-held portraits sometimes worn as jewelry--reference the life of the family and home. Each object--some rare and precious and others common fare—tells the story of the changes and continuities of daily life in America over the last 200 years.

On view in the Vollmer Gallery.

More
Less

John Steuart Curry, Kansas Cornfield, 1933. Oil on canvas, 60 3/8 x 38 3/8 inches. Wichita Art Museum, Roland P. Murdock Collection

Storytelling: Highlights and Insights from the Wichita Art Museum Collection

Every work of art has a story to tell.

When John Steuart Curry was growing up in on his family farm near Dunavant, Kansas, he would often wander into the high fields of corn. "I remember," he wrote, "wandering through them and being over-powered by the fear of being  lost in their green confines."

At 35 years of age, Curry returned to those fields to capture in his work the same sense of drama he felt, "beneath our windblown Kansas skies." For Curry, Kansas Cornfield represented the story of his youth on a Kansas farm.

When Curry's Kansas Cornfield entered WAM's permanent collection, a new chapter in its tale was written and a new story began. The work was the first painting collected by the Wichita Art Museum. As the foundational work of art for the new museum, the painting came to symbolize WAM's commitment to both the highest caliber American art and to Kansas audiences.

Today, Kansas Cornfield has become a part of many visitors' personal stories. Brett Zongker, an Associated Press journalist based in Washington D.C., recently featured the painting on his popular Twitter feed. As a self-described "son of Kansas," the painting represents home to Zongker.

Museums, by their very nature, are repositories of incredible stories. The Wichita Art Museum has introduced its visitors to the best American artwork and has been a part of thousands of engaging stories. In celebration of the museum's upcoming 80th anniversary in 2015, Storytelling, a reinstallation of the permanent collection, celebrates the histories, mysteries, and anecdotes that make the Wichita Art Museum collection unlike any other.

Each and every one of WAM's objects has a story to tell. What influenced its creation? Who is pictured? How did the work come to Wichita? Storytelling invites visitors to take another look at familiar favorites from the collection as well as important works that have been off view for many years. We hope that the artworks inspire a meaningful encounter with the past, one that is relevant to everyone's personal story today.

On view in the Louise Caldwell Murdock Gallery, Elizabeth S. Navas Gallery, and the Excel/Cargill Cares Gallery.

More
Less

Seattle-based independent curator Vicki Halper consulted on the museum's new glass display in the F. Price Cossman Memorial Trust Gallery

Art of Fire: Glass Art from the WAM Collection

Reimagined anew and opening in April, the museum presents a compelling arrangement of the distinguished and growing glass art collection. For the new display, the museum consulted with the Seattle-based independent curator and craft scholar Vicki Halper.

Notably, Halper curated WAM's popular 2014 summer exhibition Australian Glass Art, American Links for the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington.

Revealing WAM's rich holdings , the variety, quality, and artistry of Steuben glass will be presented. In fascinating ways, the exquisite work of the Steuben Glass Works, the world-class glass manufacturer (1903—2011), continues to beguile and inspire artists. The new installation will acknowledge and examine how contemporary glass artists explore the continuing allure and legacy of Steuben. Magnificent work by such living artists as Dante Marioni and Kiki Smith will be on view.

The new collection display also features a new commission--an elaborate, Steuben-inspired candelabrum--by glass artist Andy Paiko. This special work will be effervescent! It incorporates an abundantly enthusiastic array of forms and techniques first developed by Steuben. Paiko's tapering candle holders that hang gracefully from the central form, each demonstrate the Steuben "air-twist" technique, perfected by designer George Thompson. The cinched, bell-shaped forms of upper part of the large-scale candleholder are typical of Thompson's designs. WAM's collection includes original sketches by Thompson during his time working for Steuben, making Paiko’s re-imagining of Thompson's forms particularly relevant to the collection.

On view in the F. Price Cossman Memorial Trust Gallery.

More
Less

Charles M. Russell, Indian Buffalo Hunt, 1897. Oil on canvas, 36 1/4 x 48 1/4 inches. M. C. Naftzger Collection

Heritage of the West: Charles M. Russell

Charles Russell was one of the great painters of the American West. With little formal training but much firsthand experience of his subject, he captured the western landscape, wildlife, cowboys, and Indians in all of its wild if nostalgic moments.

In 1880, when he was only 16, Russell went to Montana for the first time to work on a family friend’s ranch. Ranch life was not for Russell, but he would stay in Montana for two years working for a hunter and trapper.

He began to draw and paint animals at this time and learned a great deal about their anatomy. In 1882, he went to work as a night herder for a group of cowboys called the Judith Basin Roundup, and on and off for the next 11 years he would work watching cattle by night and painting during the day.

In 1888, Russell returned to St. Louis for a short time and submitted some of his art to Harpers Weekly, where it was published. His work had become very popular in the Montana territory, and he began to sell pieces and take commissions for works when he returned.

With the advent of the railroad to Montana, the territory became more civilized, and Russell mostly gave up cowboy life in order to become a full time painter of the life he had known in the West that was now slowly fading.

On view in the Charles M. Russell Gallery.

More
Less

Thomas Moran, The Waterfall, 1857. Oil on canvas, 25 1/2 x 40 1/2 inches. Wichita Art Museum, Gift of the Robert M. Beren and Joan S. Beren Foundation

An American Salon: 19th-century Paintings from the Wichita Art Museum's Permanent Collection

The term salon style derives from the exhibition of the French Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, which began in 1667 in Paris.

In order to display work by all the Academy's students, the paintings were hung as close as possible from floor to ceiling. In the nineteenth century, this salon-style hanging became increasingly popular across Europe and in the United States. The gallery has been transformed into an American salon featuring remarkable 19th-century paintings from the museum's permanent collection.

On view in the Carlene and Lee Banks Rotunda Gallery.

More
Less

Mexican (Teotihuacan), Cylinder Tripod Vessel, about 450-600 B.C. Terra cotta, 7 x 6 1/2 inches. Wichita Art Museum, Gift of Haig, Rima, and Gregory Kurdian

Pre-Columbian Art and Artifacts from the Museum's Collection

WAM's unique collection of Pre-Columbian art and artifacts was collected by Haig Kurdian between 1954-1959 during expeditions into Mexico and Costa Rica. The collection is mostly pottery, a few pieces of metal, carved shells, and precious stones.

In Mesoamerican culture, pottery was appreciated as an artistic medium--a way people could express emotions and ideas--not solely as a utilitarian material. To make ceramic art, these ancient peoples gathered clay from local sources and formed shapes using only their hands by pinching or coiling the clay. After shaping the objects, they were placed in very hot, open fires and baked until hard.

"I particularly love that tripod bowl, from Teotihuacan, with the square legs. It's a superb, beautiful piece. To think that someone made that, not on a potter's wheel, but by piling up coils of clay, then working it and firing it. And it's survived at least 2,500 years. The other tripod bowl I love represents a squash and has parrot legs. That one is from Colima," Kurdian said.

The artifacts originated from various locations in Mexico including Colima, Veracruz, Valley of Mexico, Oaxaca, Michoacán, and Guerrero. The collection includes artifacts from Costa Rica: including Atlantic Watershed, Guanacaste-Nicoya Zone, and the Diquis Zone. The objects date from 1000 B.C. to 1450 A.D.

The collection was given to the Wichita Art Museum by Haig, Rima, and Gregory Kurdian in 1977. Then in 1986, Louise and S.O. Beren offered WAM a selection of artifacts, they had earlier received from Haig's expeditions.

On view in the Cessna Art Investigation Gallery.

More
Less

Pairpoint Glass, Candlestick (one of a pair), about 1920–1925. Blown glass, 10 1/16 x 5 3/16 inches. Gift of Robert S. Burnstein

Catching Light: Selections from the Wichita Art Museum's Burnstein Collection

Dr. Robert Burnstein, a Detroit psychiatrist, began collecting glass in the 1980s. He was attracted to American glass of the 19th and 20th centuries because, as he stated, "it was a time when handcrafted expertise and precision craftsmanship were the benchmarks of the American glass industry."

Soon he came to find that among American companies, the glass produced by Steuben was unsurpassed in quality, color intensity, and breadth of design.

Therefore, he focused his collecting first on Steuben, then on candlesticks in particular. He concentrated on candlesticks given their elegance of design and great variety of their colors and decorative techniques. Dr. Burnstein has presented his collection in honor of his parents, Donald and Arlene Burnstein.

On view in the Lulu H. Brasted Board Room.

More
Less
1400 West Museum Boulevard Wichita, KS 67203-3200 | 316-268-4921