Upcoming Exhibitions

Frederick Carl Frieseke, The Yellow Tulip, about 1902. Oil on canvas, 31 1/2 x 24 3/4 inches. Wichita Art Museum, Gift of William Connelly and Martha L. Walker

 

What She Wore: Portraiture, Fashion, and Femininity

Fashion and portraiture have always been intertwined. Particularly in images of women, clothes are used as a shorthand to describe the sitter’s personality—is she respectable and old-fashioned, over-the-top and risqué, or no-nonsense and capable?

What She Wore features nineteenth and twentieth-century portraits of women from the permanent collection, wearing everything from evening gowns to shirtdresses. Each portrait explores different ideals and conceptions of femininity, urging us to—in the words of Coco Chanel—“look for the woman in the dress. If there is no woman, there is no dress.”

What She Wore is generously supported by Anne K. Coffin.

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Preston Singletary, Dleit Yeil (White Raven), 2018. Blown, hot-sculpted, and sand-carved glass, 19 1/4 x 9 x 14 inches. Courtesy of the artist

Preston Singletary: Raven and the Box of Daylight

Raven and the Box of Daylight features the astounding glass art of Preston Singletary. The exhibition explores the Tlingit story of Raven and how the bird brings light to the world through the stars, moon, and sun. Singletary’s remarkable works—more than 50 glass sculptures including a monumental glass canoe, glass paddles, and glass river—are joined by audio and video elements to create a dynamic, multi-sensory environment. The exhibition takes visitors on an experiential journey following the transformation of darkness into light.

Singletary is one of America’s premiere glass artists. His great-grandparents were members of the Tlingit tribe—a Pacific Northwest Native American tribe. The artist draws heavily on Native American art and design in his work. Raven and the Box of Daylight is organized by the Museum of Glass, Tacoma, Washington.

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1400 West Museum Boulevard Wichita, KS 67203-3200 | 316-268-4921